Brisbane Supreme & District Court

Brisbane Supreme Court & District Court
  • Client Department of Justice and Attorney General
  • Location Brisbane, Queensland
  • Value AUD $570 million
  • Completion 2012
  • Awards QLD Master Builders Award for Innovation in Environmental Management

Lend Lease Involvement

Contractor, responsible for the design and construction.

Highlights

The new Brisbane Supreme Court and District Court building will provide the following:

  • A unique legal precinct, linking the new building with a major public square and the existing Brisbane Magistrates Court.
  • The building will be one of the largest court buildings in Australia, with over 60,000 square metres of floor space spread over 19 floors.

The project involves the development of a new Supreme Court and District Court building which will be the principal courthouse for the Supreme Court and the symbolic centre of the judicial arm of the Queensland Government. This new development is a major component of the Government’s revitalisation of the western Central Business District precinct and will be one of the largest courthouses in Australia.

The Brisbane Supreme Court and District Court precinct will be located within the existing Brisbane Magistrates Court site and will facilitate a link between the Tank Street pedestrian and cycle bridge and the existing walkway link beside the Brisbane Magistrates Court bounded by George Street, Roma Street and the square.

Scope

The building will provide:

  • Capacity for 45 courtrooms, including a large ceremonial court, Court of Appeal, 28 criminal courts and 15 civil courts.
  • Accommodation for 66 judges.
  • Mediation rooms.
  • Separate internal circulation systems.
  • A public garden. 
  • A Supreme Court library.
  • A basement cell block.
  • Closed-circuit television facilities and accommodation.
  • A jurors assembly area and lounge.
  • Registry and administrative accommodation.
  • A café in the public square stages, parts (floors, buildings etc).
  • Key build details such as type of roof, building envelope, structural frame, basement construction, foundations, building services etc.
  • External factors that affect the project such as funding, building occupation, preservation status, site status (eg. brownfield), reclamation, possessions, restrictions due to site location.

Design Challenges and Innovation

Use of natural light is a major feature of the building. The building has a double-skin glass façade with integrated screening and glass fritting to achieve shading and light control. This façade will provide both outlook and privacy for those inside the building and an external appearance of lightness and transparency.

Extensive computer modelling has been engaged to test innovative solutions and to communicate the design performance to the clients, users, authorities and others. The openness was also extended to the provision of light shafts and ‘green walls’ to the staff and prisoner areas of the basement.

Construction Challenges and Innovation

Use of natural light is a major feature of the building. The building has a double-skin glass façade with integrated screening and glass fritting to achieve shading and light control. This façade will provide both outlook and privacy for those inside the building and an external appearance of lightness and transparency.

Leadership in Safety

The design team have worked throughout the design phase to eliminate or address health and safety issues for contractors and end users. The project team has developed numerous safety initiatives including panellisation of the double-skin façade to eliminate high risk of access issues involved with assembly of the panels in-situ.

Relationships

Lend Lease has had a strong partnership with the Queensland Government over the past 30 years and has delivered a number of the state’s major public building projects including Millennium Arts at the Queensland Cultural Centre and Royal Brisbane Hospital.